Testing, Testing: Sigma, Nikon and Tamron

Testing photography gear. Photographing the same subject using different lenses.

Sigma 105mm f/1.4 for Nikon and Other Lenses: Photographing the same subject with Sigma, Tamron and Nikon lenses

There is something about testing new gear:

It starts with finding the actual time to do the testing, without having to rush through it, and you should not rush through it in the first place. Oftentimes it’s a step-by-step kinda process

It’s about getting used to using the new gear.

It offers the opportunity to come up with new ideas for photo shoots and photo projects. After all, brainstorming is always a good thing, especially in the creative world

So, here are a few images of the same subject, a Galileo thermometer, photographed with three of my lenses: Sigma 105mm f/1.4, Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 and the Nikon 28-300mm all-in-one lens.

I cropped images to show approximately the same positive/negative space.

Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Sigma @f/1.4

Sigma 105mm f/1.4 @f/2.8 and Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 @f/2.8

Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Sigma @f/2.8
Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Tamron @f/2.8

Sigma 105mm f/1.4 @f/3.5, Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 @f/3.5, Nikon 28-300mm @f/3.5 (28mm)

Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Sigma @f/3.5
Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Tamron @f/3.5
Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Nikon @f/3.5 (28mm)

Sigma 105mm f/1.4 @f/5.6, Nikon 28-300mm @f/5.6

Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Sigma @f/5.6
Product Photography: Galileo Thermometer photographed by Alina Oswald with Nikon @f/5.6 (300mm)

In the above images I looked at the bokeh created with different lenses, but also at the overall “look” and feel of the images taken with different lenses.

A few takeaways:

– Personally, I do like the bokeh created by the boker master. The Tamron creates nice bokeh, too, especially at f/2.8. For long lenses, in particular my Nikon 28-300mm with variable aperture, you need that distance in between lens and subject, something that might not always be possible when photographing inside a small room.

– There are some limitations when photographing inside the room with Sigma 105mm and much more with Nikon 28-300mm at 300mm, of course. Based on portrait and editorial photo shoots I’ve done recently, the size and shape of the room (narrow, etc) can add some limitations to photographing inside that particular room with the Sigma 105mm. (more on that in an upcoming post, when I’ll be able to share images)

– With the prime lens, sometimes I still have to remind myself that I have to zoom in with my feet, as they say.

– The lighting conditions, again, were constantly changing, with the sun in and out of the clouds. That somewhat affected the shadows/highlights to some extent.

Next I’d love to get back to photographing people. After all, that’s what I usually do. For now, I’d like to share links to a few images from my interview and photo shoot with Reverend Yolanda published in A&U Magazine–America’s AIDS Magazine . All images from this photo shoot were taken in NYC’s Washington Square Park with the Sigma 105mm f/1.4 ART for Nikon.

As always, thanks for stopping by!
Alina Oswald

  1. FABULOUS ARTICLE ALINA. REV YOLANDA IS A GRET ENTERTAINER.
    XXO GLO

    Like

    Reply

    1. Thanks, Gloria! Appreciate it. And, yes, working on more pictures as we speak. 🙂

      Like

      Reply

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