On Using the Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control

Take time to learn and explore and test out ideas in photography…or any other art form

Using the wireless shutter release remote, namely the Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (Infrared)

Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (shutter remote control). Product Photography by Alina Oswald. All Rights Reserved.

Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (shutter remote control) and case. Product Photography by Alina Oswald. All Rights Reserved.

These days I find myself more an more surviving, not living, one moment at a time, focusing on one thing at a time. Therefore, in order to make use of the limited available time, I find myself going back to what I know, because it for sure works. And that’s okay. But living from one moment to the next allows little if no time to try out new things and, therefore, to grow. And one can grow only while exploring, experimenting, allowing oneself to test out ideas and make mistakes, and, in the process, to figure out what works and what doesn’t.

Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (shutter remote control). Product Photography by Alina Oswald. All Rights Reserved.

Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (shutter remote control) and case. Product Photography by Alina Oswald. All Rights Reserved.

The other day, I remembered that I’m in dire need of new self-portraits–I haven’t done that in a long time–and startied sorting through my gear bag. That’s how I discovered a wireless shutter release remote that I had bought quite a long time ago and never really used. It was late at night and there was nothing else to do for the night, and so I decided to give it another try. Here’s my experience so far.

First, full disclosure, I always buy most, if not all, of my photo and lighting gear at B&H, in Manhattan. I did the same with the tiny Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (IR). By the way, I’m a Nikon shooter, currently using a Nikon D750. The wireless remote control comes with a CR 2025 Lithium battery and a tiny storage case. It works best in front of the camera. I haven’t really tried using it from behind the camera yet, still experimenting.

TestShoot_glasses_remotecontrol_ao_lr

Photographing my glasses for a test shoot, using a #Nikon D750 with 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, a Nikon SB700 speedlight (off camera) and a Nikon ML-L3 Wireless Remote Control (IR). #Bts photo by Alina Oswald. Bts image taken with an iPhone 7Plus

So, how to use the wireless remote control?

First, make sure that the wireless remote control works with your camera! It does work with Nikon D750. If it does, try the following:

– on the back of the camera, press i (info)

– scroll down to Remote control mode (ML-L3) and press OK (default setting should be OFF)

– scroll up/down to choose the preferred setting–I tried “2s Delayed remote” and “Quick-response remote” I think the 2s-delay works best for self-portraits; try it out and see what works best for you

– also, no need to change the camera settings to “self-timer mode”

Note: from what I’ve noticed so far, the setting reverses to ‘ML-L3 off’ so you might want to check it out, during the shoot, to make sure that it’s still on. If you take too long of a break in between pressing the shutter release, the ML-L3 setting might reverse to ‘off’ but, as I said, there is still more to be explored.

But for now, here are a couple of bts videos from my very brief photo shoot, as well as the resulting images.

 

Here’s one of the resulting images:

Dirty glasses in the dark. Photo by Alina Oswald.

My glasses, in much need of a good cleaning, photographed with a Nikon wireless shutter remote. Photo by Alina Oswald.

 

Nikon wireless shutter remote; product photography; photo gear; glasses

As I mentioned above, I’m in need of new portraits, self-portraits, so the wireless remote control should make things a bit easier. Will see….

As always, thanks for stopping by!

Alina Oswald

 

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