Nikon Z 24-200mm – First Impressions

Beyond the Lens.

So, as mentioned in a previous post, a couple of weeks ago I traded in some of my photo gear and got myself, among others, a Nikon Z 24-200mm lens.

Note: if you’re into minimalist gear, the Nikon Z 24-200mm might be the lens for you.

Here are a few first impressions:

The Nikon Z 24-200mm lens:

  • is used on full-frame Nikon mirrorless cameras (obviously); it can also be used on a cropped-sensor camera, offering a 36-300mm focal-length range (or as I call it “zoom experience”)
  • is pretty small and lightweight, and that’s fantastic when your wrists that are not as strong as they used to be
  • some call it a “minimalist lens” because it has a minimum number of buttons, switches, rings, etc.
  • is comfortable to hold in hand and carry around – great lens for everyday use, to grab and go, walk around and photograph
  • the protective UV filter is a 67mm filter
  • it has a zoom lock switch, which also comes in handy

  • Lady Liberty watches over New York harbor at night. ©Alina Oswald.
  • The Staten Island Ferry sails by Lady Liberty
  • there is no AF/MF switch – default focus mode is AF (Auto Focus); you can override it by rotating the focus ring; basically, once you adjust the focus manually, it switches to MF (Manual Focus)
  • is a VR lens; the camera is VR, too; the lens’ VR can be disabled/enabled from the camera menu;
  • NOTE: the VR setting on my Z6/24-200mm is grayed out, but I might have to change a few settings and/or upgrade the firmware; also, the VR setting/option on mirrorless cameras might be grayed out, especially when using an F lens/FTZ adapter; make sure you upgrade the firmware first, and then give it another try.
  • zoom: 24-200mm – f/4 @ 24mm — f/6.3 @200mm
  • variable aperture is something to be expected with these everyday-use lenses; what’s kinda disappointing is that it’s only (the variable maximum aperture is only) f/4 – f/6.3 ; that doesn’t necessarily make it a fast lens…yet, the Nikon Z 24-200mm performs nicely in low-light conditions, or at least so far so good. (in general, it appears that the Z lenses perform better in low-light conditions than their F counterparts)

  • Blue Tribute Lights from the Oculus to the September 11 Tribute Lights in NYC, as seen from One WTC Observatory on 9/11/2021.
  • 9/11 Memorial and Museum, and the Oculus on September 11, 2021. ©Alina Oswald. All Rights Reserved.
  • 9/11 Tribute in Light over NYC and NY Harbor. ©Alina Oswald.
  • September 11 Tribute in Light. ©Alina Oswald. All Rights Reserved.
  • September 11 Tribute Lights over NYC and NY Harbor as seen from One WTC Observatory on 9/11/2021. ©Alina Oswald.

In Summary:

Overall, for its purpose, I do believe that the Nikon Z 24-200mm is a good–even a great–investment.

It’s a practical, lightweight, small size, uncomplicated, all-in-one lens with a minimalist look and feel.

It’s a great grab-and-go and/or travel lens, too, that fits nicely (together with basically any Nikon Z camera body) in a small, over-the-shoulder gear bag. It’s also practical when photographing events, and, while not a portrait lens, it certainly does a good job when photographing people, in particular when photographing people on location.

As photographers, or as people who like capturing images or life as it unfolds around us, the Nikon Z 24-200mm is a good-to-have and even a must-have lens for everyday use. In addition, as of right now, there is no other Nikon mirrorless all-in-one, grab-and-go lens available, not yet.

I’ll test some more and share in upcoming posts.

‘Til then and as always, thank you for stopping by.

Alina Oswald

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